ODI Fridays: Startup diversity – what isn’t measured doesn’t change

$download_content = get_field('download_content');

Details

Fri Sep 18, 2020 13:00
Online

Is it truly possible to achieve diversity in tech without an acknowledgement of the importance of data collection across all demographics?

ODI Fridays are free lunchtime lectures for everyone. You bring your lunch, we provide tea and coffee, an interesting talk, and enough time to get back to your desk.

Is it truly possible to achieve diversity in tech without an acknowledgement of the importance of data collection across all demographics?

Talent is equally distributed, but access to funding for startups is not. 93% of all funds raised by European venture capital-backed companies in 2018 went to all-male founding teams. Diversity VC’s 2019 research suggests that venture capital in the UK lacks diversity besides gender.

Yet, to date, no data exists to enable the extrapolation of other exclusionary demographic factors, and as we know, what isn’t measured, doesn’t change. This lack of data presents a significant opportunity to both measure and diversify access to funding and investment beyond gender.

There is a dearth of data on the investments made into entrepreneurial ventures that are founded by those who are diverse. But that data is untapped by way of socio-economic factors – including ethnicity, socio economic status, age and sexual orientation.

Erika Brodnock – an award winning entrepreneur (including Female Entrepreneur of the Year and Intel’s Global Business Challenge) – shares her research around ‘Diversifying access to finance for all’ and explains why we need to get more diversity in investment data.

About the speaker

Erika Brodnock is an award winning entrepreneur (including Female Entrepreneur of the Year and Intel’s Global Business Challenge), philanthropist, life coach, Research Fellow at King’s College London, and keynote speaker.

Educated at top UK institutions, Erika is an entrepreneurial and driven MBA with 12 years coaching, wellbeing and inclusion experience, currently researching how artificial intelligence can be used as a force for good in the creation of social justice.

Through her work at the intersection of technology, wellbeing and product development, Erika has built products and services in the ed-tech, parenting, and now financial markets that disrupt and spearhead a path out of outdated systems.