About the ODI

The ODI was co-founded in 2012 by the inventor of the web Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Artificial Intelligence expert Sir Nigel Shadbolt to advocate for the innovative use of open data to affect positive change across the globe.

The ODI was co-founded in 2012 by the inventor of the web Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Artificial Intelligence expert Sir Nigel Shadbolt to advocate for the innovative use of open data to affect positive change across the globe.

We’re an independent, non-profit, non-partisan company that, since our creation, has welcomed high profile board members including Lastminute.com founder Baroness Martha Lane Fox and former European Commissioner Neelie Kroes.

Headquartered in London, with an international reach, hundreds of members, thousands of people trained, dozens of startups incubated, and a convening space based in the heart of London’s thriving Shoreditch area, we invite everyone interested in developing with data – whether on an individual, organisational or global level – to get in touch.

What we do

We are working with commercial and non-commercial companies and governments to build an open, trustworthy data ecosystem, where people can make better decisions using data and manage its harmful impacts.

We work with our partners to help make data as open as possible while protecting people’s privacy, commercial confidentiality and national security. We strive to find the right balance for all societies and economies to feel data’s benefits fairly.

We advocate for and support practices that increase trust and trustworthiness: building ethical considerations into how data is collected, managed and used; ensuring equity around who can access and use data; engaging widely with affected people and organisations.

We help people identify and address how open data can be used effectively in their sector to improve decision making and processes, deliver more efficient and effective services and products, and fuel economic growth and productivity.

We connect, equip and inspire people around the world to innovate with data by:

  • providing strategic advice – identifying how data can help to achieve programme goals and how to measure success, for example
  • developing policy development and guidance – scrutinising interaction between general data governance practices and sector norms, for example
  • advising on technology development – creating an appropriate data standard and the tools needed to support it
  • researching – from creating case studies of the role of data in the sector to rigorous impact evaluation
  • providing training – including blended learning packages that combine face-to-face, eLearning and webinars
  • running competitions and acceleration programmes  – to foster innovation in the sector
  • building communities within the sector – and communicating clearly with them